Trump’s divisive inauguration countered with overwhelming, three-times larger response of unity and love

Authorities now estimate the crowd size for the Women’s March, the day after to have been three-times larger then the crowds gathered to witness Trump take the Oath of Office, on Friday January 20, 2017.

(Images available via NurPhoto at Getty Images)

While compiling my images of both days into one set, I began to understand how Americans believe they live in completely alternate  parallel realities. So, I wondered just how many people who attended the inauguration on Friday also attended the #WomensMarch on Saturday. Besides a handful of journalists, I don’t believe there were many who did.

Emotions overwhelm Ella Johnson, of Los Angeles, CA, as she stands along the Parade Route, in support of outgoing President Barack Obama, on Jan. 20th 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
Emotions overwhelm Ella Johnson, of Los Angeles, CA, as she stands along the Parade Route, in support of outgoing President Barack Obama, on Jan. 20th 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
View from 7th St, looking towards the Caption shows thin crowds gathered in the non-ticketed, general public area at the National Mall, in Washington, D.C. to witness the Inauguration ceremony of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States, on January 20, 2017. Scientist and authorities estimate the 2017 crowd size ten-times smaller then those who gathered for the historic 2009 inauguration of Barrack Obama. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
View from 7th St, looking towards the Caption shows thin crowds gathered in the non-ticketed, general public area at the National Mall, in Washington, D.C. to witness the Inauguration ceremony of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States, on January 20, 2017. Scientist and authorities estimate the 2017 crowd size ten-times smaller then those who gathered for the historic 2009 inauguration of Barrack Obama. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
The hand of Donald J. Trump is seen on the large screen as the statue of Freedom towers above the United States Caption building, the moment the 45th President of the United States takes the oath for office, during the January 20, 2017 Inauguration Ceremony, in Washington, D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
The hand of Donald J. Trump is seen on the large screen as the statue of Freedom towers above the United States Caption building, the moment the 45th President of the United States takes the oath for office, during the January 20, 2017 Inauguration Ceremony, in Washington, D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)

During my two-day coverage I witnessed a wide range of emotions. At the Washington Mall on Friday, 160,000 gazed at large screens in admiration, feeling pride for their nation. Only a few blocks away — divided by impenetrable barriers at Pennsylvania Avenue — protestors clashed with riot police after setting a limousine ablaze at Franklin Square Park.

Twenty-four hours later it became clear the world had changed. The people surrounded the People’s House. I teared up seeing the thousands of signs left at the fence near the White House.

A limousine parked at the North side of Franklin Sq park, in Washington, D.C. is vandalized and later set ablaze as protests erupt after Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States, on January 20th, 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
A limousine parked at the North side of Franklin Sq park, in Washington, D.C. is vandalized and later set ablaze as protests erupt after Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States, on January 20th, 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
A limousine is set ablaze near Franklin Square Park, in Washington, D.C. as protests erupt after Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States, on January 20th, 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
A Trump sign lays on the roof of a  limousine set ablaze near Franklin Square Park, in Washington, D.C. as protests erupt after Donald Trump becomes the 45th President of the United States, on January 20th, 2017, in Washington D.C. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
An estimated 500.000 protested in Washington DC, on Jan. 21, 2017, during the Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
An estimated 500.000 protested in Washington DC, on Jan. 21, 2017, during the Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)

Certainly most of Saturday’s marchers arrived that same day. My guess is that  most Trump supporters either stayed in their hotel rooms or had already left DC by day two ( I might have only seen a handful).

The first groups of protestors march past the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as an estimated 500.000 have gathered to participate in the Jan. 21, 2017 Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
The first groups of protestors march past the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as an estimated 500.000 have gathered to participate in the Jan. 21, 2017 Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
The first groups of protestors march past the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as an estimated 500.000 have gathered to participate in the Jan. 21, 2017 Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
The first groups of protestors march past the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as an estimated 500.000 have gathered to participate in the Jan. 21, 2017 Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
Near the SouthEast corner of the White House complex participants of the Women's March on Washington, D.C. have friendly interactions with officers of the Mounted Unit as an estimated 500.000 protest on Jan. 21, 2017, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
Near the SouthEast corner of the White House complex participants of the Women’s March on Washington, D.C. have friendly interactions with officers of the Mounted Unit as an estimated 500.000 protest on Jan. 21, 2017, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)

But I am doubtful their hearts would have melted even if they saw the massive crowds of almost 500,000 women donning pink-knitted hats and guys holding signs that read ‘I am With Her, and Her, and Her, and Her’.

Even though fatigue eventually limited my ability to take it all in, I am so glad I was able to cover both days. Without this massive boost of positivity I am afraid the first-ever trip to my new home’s Capitol would have become a very lasting sour memory.

Hillary Clinton cut-out is carried by a protestor as an estimated 500.000 protested in Washington DC, on Jan. 21, 2017, during the Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
Hillary Clinton cut-out is carried by a protestor as an estimated 500.000 protested in Washington DC, on Jan. 21, 2017, during the Women’s March on Washington, a day after the inauguration of Donald Trump as President of the United States. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)
Thousands of protest signs are left behind by protestors at the gates surrounding the White House, after hundred-thousands participated in the Women’s March, on Jan. 21, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Bastiaan Slabbers/Bastiaan Slabbers)
Thousands of protest signs are left behind by protestors at the gates surrounding the White House, after hundred-thousands participated in the Women’s March, on Jan. 21, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto)

Gladly, I witnessed a tremendous — often overwhelming —  boost of positive energy from people who came together in full force to #resist something that should not have a place on this planet.